OpenGL

WebGL and OpenGL

WebGL and OpenGl

Lately, you’ve probably heard a lot about WebGL and how it is transforming graphics rendered in a web browser. The consortium definition is quoted below. As highlighted in the quotation, here I will to show the similarities between desktop OpenGL and browser WebGL.

WebGL is a cross-platform, royalty-free web standard for a low-level 3D graphics API based on OpenGL ES 2.0, exposed through the HTML5 Canvas element as Document Object Model interfaces. Developers familiar with OpenGL ES 2.0 will recognize WebGL as a Shader-based API using GLSL, with constructs that are semantically similar to those of the underlying OpenGL ES 2.0 API. It stays very close to the OpenGL ES 2.0 specification, with some concessions made for what developers expect out of memory-managed languages such as JavaScript.

If you are not familiar with some of the terminology, review these pages.
OpenGL – Then and Now
Programmable pipeline with VBOs and Shaders

You can access the code at https://github.com/cognitivewaves/OpenGL-Render .
Desktop OpenGL : main.cpp
Browser WebGL : webgl/main.html

As you will see in the snapshots of code snippets, most of differences are in the programming language constructs of C/C++ vs JavaScript. Hope it provides some insight into how OpenGL and WebGL are more similar than different.

Shader Code

OpenGL and WebGL Shader code differences

Shader Initialization

OpenGL and WebGL Initialize shaders code differences

Draw/Render

OpenGL and WebGL draw code differences


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OpenGL – Then and Now

I had spent a fair amount of time on OpenGL about 10 years back, though I wouldn’t call myself an expert. Over these 10 years, I noticed OpenGL evolving and kept pace with it from the outside. Then came WebGL and wanted to get my hands dirty. That’s when I realized that I was way out of touch. As they say, the devil is in the details. All the terminology and jargon just wasn’t adding up. So I went back to basics.

Here is an attempt to summarize the evolution and status of OpenGL. It’s not meant to be an introduction to OpenGL but more for those who want to go from “then” to “now” in one page. For more details, see OpenGL – VBO, Shader, VAO.

Background

Traditionally, all graphics processing was done in the CPU which generated a bitmap (pixel image) in the frame buffer (a portion in RAM) and pushed it to the video display. Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) changed that paradigm. It was specialized hardware to do the heavy graphics computations. The GPU provided a set of “fixed” functions to do some standard operations on the graphics data, which is referred to as the Fixed Function Pipeline (FFP). Though the Fixed Function Pipelline was fast and efficient, it lacked flexibility. So GPUs introduced the Programmable Pipeline, the programmable alternative to the “hard coded” approach.

OpenGL

OpenGL 1.0 (Classic OpenGL) provided libraries to compute on the CPU and interfaced with the Fixed Function Pipeline. OpenGL 2.0 (and higher) adds Programmable Pipeline API.

OpenGL-ES (GLES)

OpenGL ES is OpenGL for Embedded Systems for mobile phones, PDAs, and video game consoles, basically for devices with limited computation capability. It consists of well-defined subsets of desktop OpenGL. Desktop graphics card drivers typically did not support the OpenGL-ES API directly. However, as of 2010 graphics card manufacturers introduced ES support in their desktop drivers and this makes the ES term in the specification confusing. OpenGL ES 2.0 is based on OpenGL 2.0 with the fixed function API removed.

WebGL

WebGL is a Programmable Pipeline API, with constructs that are semantically similar to those of the underlying OpenGL ES 2.0 API. It stays very close to the OpenGL ES 2.0 specification, with some concessions made for what developers expect with memory-managed languages such as JavaScript. See WebGL and OpenGL.

Programmable Pipeline, Shaders and GLSL

The Programmable Pipeline requires a Program which is “equivalent” to the functions provided by the Fixed Function Pipeline. These programs are called Shaders. The programming language for the shaders used to be assembly language but as the complexity increased, high-level languages for GPU programming emerged, one of which is called OpenGL Shading Language (GLSL). Like any program, the Shader program needs to be compiled and linked. However, the Shader code is loaded to the GPU, compiled and linked at runtime using APIs provided by OpenGL.

Conclusion

So, modern OpenGL is great, except it makes learning graphics programming harder (much harder). It is generally easier to teach new graphics programmers using the Fixed Function Pipeline. Ideas behind Shaders are pretty complicated and the minimum required knowledge in basic 3D programming (vertex creation, transformation matrices, lighting etc.) is substantial. There is a lot more code to write and many more places to screw up. A classic fixed function OpenGL programmer was oblivious to most of these nasty details.

“Then” was Fixed Function Pipeline and “Now” is Programmable Pipeline. Much of what was learned then must be abandoned now. Programmability wipes out almost all of the fixed function pipeline, so the knowledge does not transfer well. To make matters worse, OpenGL has started to deprecate fixed functionality. In OpenGL 3.2, the Core Profile lacks these fixed-function concepts. The compatibility profile keeps them around.

The transition in terms of code and philosophy is detailed in OpenGL – VBO, Shader, VAO.